INTRODUCING TEMPUS NEXT: AI-ENABLED CARE PATHWAY INTELLIGENCE /// EXPLORE NOW INTRODUCING TEMPUS NEXT: AI-ENABLED CARE PATHWAY INTELLIGENCE ///
October 20 — 24, 2023 MADRID, SPAIN

Booth #581
Evening Reception

ESMO Congress 2023

Tempus is advancing precision medicine through the practical application of artificial intelligence in healthcare. We are pleased to share our latest scientific and clinical research findings along with new AI-enabled technology during the ESMO Congress 2023.

Schedule a meeting with us

Tempus Customer Reception

Saturday, 21 October 2023
19:00–21:00

MOM Culinary Institute
C. de Serrano, 95, 28006 Madrid, Spain

Join us to explore Tempus' groundbreaking contributions to precision medicine in the heart of Madrid's Salamanca district. Engage with peers over food and light refreshments at a distinguished culinary institute, all while immersing yourself in the city's charm.

RSVP here
Poster Highlights
October 21, 2023
Time
9:00 - 17:00 CEST (live presentation 12:00 - 13:00 CEST)

Location
Hall 8
Presentation Number
185P

Real-world data analysis of genomic profiling-matched targeted therapy outcomes in patients with advanced fusion-positive NSCLC

Authors
Jyoti Patel (Northwestern University), Rotem Ben-Shachar (Tempus), Kaveri Nadhamuni (Tempus), Mark Carty (Tempus), Rafi Pelossof (Tempus), Ira Klein (Tempus), Halla Nimeiri (Tempus), Charu Aggarwal (University of Pennsylvania) , Ryan Gentzler (University of Virginia)

In a study of 1,950 advanced NSCLC patients, the research team leveraged Tempus’ multimodal real-world database to find that the majority of clinicians utilized comprehensive genomic profiling in a timely manner to treat patients with ESMO-recommended targeted therapy in fusion-positive cases (n=65). More importantly, patients having taken fusion-positive-matched guideline-recommended treatments had improved real-world overall survival compared to patients who did not receive the fusion-positive-matched therapy.

Time
9:00 - 17:00 CEST (live presentation 12:00 - 13:00 CEST)

Location
Hall 8
Presentation Number
182P

ALK Fusion Detection by RNA Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) Compared to DNA in a Large, Real-World Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Dataset

Authors
Wade Iams (Vanderbilt), Rotem Ben-Shachar (Tempus), Lisa Gai (Tempus), Kyle Beauchamp (Tempus), Nitya Sharma (Tempus), Sumaiya Islam (Tempus), Justin Guinney (Tempus), Halla Nimeiri (Tempus), Ryan Gentzler (University of Virginia), Ezra Cohen (Tempus)

Researchers reviewed a cohort of 7,428 advanced-stage NSCLC patients from Tempus’ multimodal real-world database and found a subset of patients with ALK fusions identified by at least one NGS assay (either EML4, KIF5B, KLC1, or PICALM as the fusion partner). Among those patients harboring ALK fusions, the majority had the fusion detected by both DNA- and RNA-NGS, while some fusions were detected only by RNA-NGS, and a lower proportion were detected only by DNA-NGS. In total, combining both DNA- and RNA-NGS sequencing improved the detection of ALK fusions compared to DNA-NGS alone.

Time
9:00 - 17:00 CEST (live presentation 12:00 - 13:00 CEST)

Location
Hall 8
Presentation Number
203P

Genomic characterization of sporadic MET amplified NSCLC and association with real-world outcomes

Authors
Ryan Gentzler (University of Virginia), Nitya Sharma (Tempus), Akash Mitra (Tempus), Rotem Ben-Shachar (Tempus), Michelle Stein (Tempus), Justin Guinney (Tempus), Halla Nimeiri (Tempus), Wade Iams (Vanderbilt), Charu Aggarwal (University of Pennsylvania), Jyoti Patel (Northwestern University)

Researchers leveraged Tempus’ multimodal real-world database to assess molecular features of NSCLC patient tumors biopsied prior to or within 30 days of the start of first-line immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy (n=3,998) and stratified results based on presence or absence of MET copy number amplification (CNA). The team found that tumors positive for MET CNAs but negative for EGFR mutations were significantly enriched with biomarkers that are predictive of immunotherapy benefit (PD-L1-High and TMB-High) relative to MET copy number neutral, EGFR-negative tumors. Despite this finding, there was not a significant difference in real-world overall survival based on MET copy number status.

Time
9:00 - 17:00 CEST (live presentation 13:45 - 14:45 CEST)

Location
Hall 8
Presentation Number
574P

Comparative Analysis Between the Tumor Immune Microenvironments of Microsatellite Stable (MSS) and Microsatellite Instability-High (MSI) Colorectal Primary and Metastatic Sites

Authors
Marwan G. Fakih (City of Hope), Jian Ye (City of Hope), ChongKai Wang (City of Hope), Colt Egelston (City of Hope), Minxuan Huang (Tempus), Jacob Mercer (Tempus), Michael A. Thompson (Tempus), Jun Gong (Cedars Sinai)

Researchers utilized Tempus’ multimodal real-world database to expand upon previous research comparing the tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) of colorectal cancer samples collected from primary versus metastatic sites. The team found that microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high) colorectal cancers that metastasized to the liver or peritoneum had favorable TIME compared to microsatellite-stable (MSS) samples from those same metastatic sites. Notably, the TIME of MSS colorectal cancers that metastasized to the lung had greater similarity to MSI-high samples that metastasized to the liver or peritoneum compared to MSS metastases to these respective sites. Together, these findings offer a potential explanation for observed trends in response to checkpoint inhibitor therapy in patients with colorectal cancer.

Time
9:00 - 17:00 CEST (live presentation 12:00 - 13:00 CEST)

Location
Hall 8
Presentation Number
2387P

Avelumab first-line maintenance (1LM) for locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (la/mUC): treatment (Tx) patterns and real-world (rw) outcomes in the US

Authors
Kenneth Carson (Northwestern University), Seyed Hamidreza Mahmoudpour (Merck) , Chiemeka Ike (EMD Serono,), Sebastian Monzon (Tempus), Stamatina Fragkogianni (Tempus), Jennifer Ferrer (Tempus), Mairead Kearney (Merck)

In a study conducted using the Tempus multimodal real-world database, the team examined patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer who received first-line (1L) platinum-based chemotherapy and who then followed up with 1L maintenance on avelumab. Within this cohort, researchers observed that while follow up times were short, results supported the use of avelumab for patients with no evidence of disease progression after completion of 1L platinum-based chemotherapy. Further study is needed.

Schedule a meeting with us

We'll be in touch shortly.